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Top Jobs for 2009 Are in Math, Science and Technology

Math careers top out the list of best careers in 2009.
Math careers top out the list of best careers in 2009.

The greatest revenge of the nerds may be in the realm of careers.

Math, science and numbers-centric careers have topped out a list of 200 as having the best jobs, according to  a study published by job site CareerCast.com earlier this year. The numbers were culled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and crunched by Les Krantz, author of “Jobs Rated Almanac,” and other trade association studies, says a WSJ.com.

From the WSJ.com article:

According to the study, mathematicians fared best in part because they typically work in favorable conditions — indoors and in places free of toxic fumes or noise — unlike those toward the bottom of the list like sewage-plant operator, painter and bricklayer. They also aren’t expected to do any heavy lifting, crawling or crouching — attributes associated with occupations such as firefighter, auto mechanic and plumber. The study also considers pay, which was determined by measuring each job’s median income and growth potential.

And here’s a snapshot of the list with the best and worst careers, also from the WSJ.com article:

The Best The Worst
1. Mathematician 200. Lumberjack
2. Actuary 199. Dairy Farmer
3. Statistician 198. Taxi Driver
4. Biologist 197. Seaman
5. Software Engineer 196. EMT
6. Computer Systems Analyst 195. Roofer
7. Historian 194. Garbage Collector
8. Sociologist 193. Welder
9. Industrial Designer 192. Roustabout
10. Accountant 191. Ironworker
11. Economist 190. Construction Worker
12. Philosopher 189. Mail Carrier
13. Physicist 188. Sheet Metal Worker
14. Parole Officer 187. Auto Mechanic
15. Meteorologist 186. Butcher
16. Medical Laboratory Technician 185. Nuclear Decontamination Tech
17. Paralegal Assistant 184. Nurse (LN)
18. Computer Programmer 183. Painter
19. Motion Picture Editor 182. Child Care Worker
20. Astronomer 181. Firefighter

As you can see, the sciences that involve numbers, critical thinking and creative problem solving top the best careers. But what do you do if it’s too late in your career to become a Mathematician or Computer Analyst?

While you may not be able to switch your career easily and suddenly start coding in PHP or solving complex equations, you can figure out your quantifiable, transferable business skills without having to have mastered trigonometry. Tie benefits to each transferable skill [on your resume], writes senior recruiter Joe Turner in the article “Transferable Skills Alone Won’t Win That Job.” From that article:

Another way of looking at this is to ask yourself, “How am I an asset to a company’s balance sheet?” Focus on how your work either helps the company make money or save money. Think beyond even your skill sets and job duties, and list every possible example of how you have helped to save time for your employer. (Time equals money.)

By including several specific achievements, you separate yourself from your competitors and are much more likely to gain the attention of your next employer.

Sit down with a legal pad and write down all of your achievements from current or past jobs. For example, if you’re looking for a job as a project manager, make a list of your completed projects and ask the question, “So what?” after each one. What you’re after is the achievement.

Want more career, resume and job advice? Look here:

Rewritten Resume Adds Context, Lands Project Manager New Job

Receive a Layoff Letter? Don’t Check Out Yet

Selling Your Salary in a Penny-Pinching Economy

[Image by Silenceofnightvia Flickr cc 2.0]

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Discussion

2 comments for “Top Jobs for 2009 Are in Math, Science and Technology”

  1. This is obvious, we’ve always known that. Bill Gates was a college dropout AND a nerd – what a catch he turned out to be! :)

    Posted by Laura W | August 23, 2010, 8:35 pm
  2. There is still a massive shortage of mathmaticians world wide. Most go into programming and coding these days as there is more money

    Posted by Mr. Solar | May 20, 2011, 4:35 am

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